soar the slopes.

 

As we move and groove to the tune of Mother Nature’s song, we find ourselves emerged in the flow of seasonal transition. Suddenly, the sun is rising strong, and the crowds on the slopes are spreading thin. There’s no better time to soar the slopes, and to be grateful for the snow still shining.

Fly like an eagle.

With consistent 60 degree days, snow conditions are reminiscent of spring. The opportunity to make more snow is few and far between, but we aren’t ready to forfeit just yet. Monday night, our guns were up and running, gracing the slopes with another sprinkle of snow. If odds go our way, there’s a chance for more recoup come Sunday night.

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Redefine happy hour.  

We know the sun calls for bike rides and dog walks and sipping margaritas at Slopeside, but the slopes beg you to keep skiing and riding. It takes a lot of energy to keep an east coast winter white. Waste not, want not— time to take advantage of the season stretch and snow play.

Here’s a break down on the primary energy powerhouse needed to make snow:

horse·pow·er
/ hôrsˌpou(ə)r/
noun: a unit of power equal to 33,000 foot pounds per minute (745.7 watts)

In a simple understanding, think of horsepower as the ability to lift 33,000 pounds and to move it one foot over a period of one minute. That’s a lot of strength. And endurance. And hard work. The power of an engine is measured by this strength.

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Cat tracks.

Snowmaking at Blue:

Compressors create air to make snow. We have nine compressors with a collective strength of 9750 horsepower.

Water pumps move water to where it needs to be to make snow (i.e. trails, pond). We have 43 pumps with a collective strength of 7175 horsepower.

Fan guns are a type of gun used to make snow. We have 46 guns with 40 horsepower for a collective strength of 1840 fan gun horsepower.

Groomers are the cats that track the slopes, turning snow piles to skiable terrain. Every night, we have seven groomers at work with a collective strength of 2500 horsepower.

9750 + 7175 + 1840 + 2500 = 21, 265 horsepower

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21,265 is a big number. A reminder that hard work, collective strength, and energy is what gives this mountain true grit and snow shine.


MISER FILES:

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Kristin

Meet, Kristin Lenart.

Better known as: Sparkles

Work: Full time, night crew Terrain Park Groomer Operator, Mountain Ops

Play: Ski

Favorite trail: Switchback because “it’s fun and fast.”

A word from Papa Miser: “Kristin does a great job grooming parks and building terrain base learning. She brings many years of experience from having different jobs at different mountains. She’s a good asset to our team.”

Kristin has worked in the ski industry for eighteen years, operating snow cats for the past thirteen. In the summer, Kristin is the Excavator Operator for the Blue Mountain Bike Park. She has been skiing for 28 years and continues riding the trails mountain biking when the snow melts. Kristin notes, she’s been “lucky to experience” Mammoth and June Mountain in CA.

eddie
Eddie

Meet, Edward Maslanka.

Better known as: Eddie

Work: Seasonal, day crew Snowmaker, Mountain Ops

Play: Snowboard

A word from Papa Miser: “Eddie is quick to catch on to snowmaking. He is willing to do any and every job that is given to him, and he does it well. He’s always willing to learn. We hope he returns back next year.”

This is Eddie’s first season with the snowmiser crew. In his free time, he likes to ride his dirt bike and four wheeler.


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When the sun shines, the snow sparkles.

See you on the slopes,

the snowmisers

dump-em-out

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4 thoughts on “soar the slopes.

  1. Are you going to make snow this Sunday? I am planning to bring a group of 6 people on to the mountain on Monday. Last time we were there ( a couple of weeks ago) the green trails were not very nice because the snow was very loose and heavy.

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    1. Hey Lilly– it’s been a tough winter. This week’s warm front made trail conditions rough with patches of hard-packed snow and sugar granules spread across the slopes. The good news is, weather conditions are looking good for tonight and we are planning to make snow when wet-bulb temps hit 28 and below. Tomorrow will be sunny. Expect conditions to change throughout the day. Hopefully, you’ll have a great day on the slopes. Conditions will be the best they can be. Thanks for reading!

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